3D Camera Interaxial distance (Ideal distance is regarded as about the same as the human eyes)

3D Camera Interaxial distance (Ideal distance is regarded as about the same as the human eyes)

Creative Scene Blocking for 3D Movies:

The aim of making technically good 3D movies, is so that there is no harm done to audiences. Harm can be done by any number of ways, top of the list being too much background or foreground parallax in a scene, thereby making it hard for the eyes to “fuse” parts of the 3D scene either in the distance or up close, and excessive “depth jump cuts” (when a preceding and followup scene are at different depths that force the eye to re-converge too quickly).

In this article we look at creative framing for medium to close-up action and a look at choices to be made in a 3D Camera Rig for shooting such scenes.

Read the rest in the Book, “THINK in 3D” via Amazon: Paperback & e-book (also on iPad via free kindle app)

  • http://twitter.com/clydd Clyde DeSouza

    I received a question by email, that is worth answering here. The question was can VDSLRs (Video Dslr cameras) be used for 3D?. After all they are cheap, lightweight and have bigger sensors than even the RED One.

    The answer is No. At least not the current VDSLRs out right now. The reason is Genlocking.
    This is not possible with VDSLR cameras available today. These VDSLRs use Cmos sensors, that by nature scan or “paint” a scene across the sensor. So although you might get frame level sync by using a clapper board, or any other visual/audio cue… you will not get Scan line level sync.

    This artifact will quickly become apparent on any areas of simple movement such as wheels of cars. peoples feet or flapping of birds wings etc.

    So although tempting to use, they *could* be used only in scenes that don’t have much movement… very hard to come across in a typical feature movie.
    Shooting at a fps of 50 or 60 still does not solve the problem.
    (there are other issues currently, like the non full HD signal without rec stamp output from HDMI, so you are limited to the 47mbps avchd compression, the “jello” effect etc.)

    These can be dealt with to a certain extent, but the lack of Genlock severely cripples the use of these cameras for 3D.

    Hope this helps.

  • http://twitter.com/clydd Clyde DeSouza

    I received a question by email, that is worth answering here. The question was can VDSLRs (Video Dslr cameras) be used for 3D?. After all they are cheap, lightweight and have bigger sensors than even the RED One.

    The answer is No. At least not the current VDSLRs out right now. The reason is Genlocking.
    This is not possible with VDSLR cameras available today. These VDSLRs use Cmos sensors, that by nature scan or “paint” a scene across the sensor. So although you might get frame level sync by using a clapper board, or any other visual/audio cue… you will not get Scan line level sync.

    This artifact will quickly become apparent on any areas of simple movement such as wheels of cars. peoples feet or flapping of birds wings etc.

    So although tempting to use, they *could* be used only in scenes that don't have much movement… very hard to come across in a typical feature movie.
    Shooting at a fps of 50 or 60 still does not solve the problem.
    (there are other issues currently, like the non full HD signal without rec stamp output from HDMI, so you are limited to the 47mbps avchd compression, the “jello” effect etc.)

    These can be dealt with to a certain extent, but the lack of Genlock severely cripples the use of these cameras for 3D.

    Hope this helps.